6. Adequate clearance around parked stationary vehicles, including the hold back position when you are giving way to oncoming vehicles.

Adequate clearance, meeting traffic and the holding back position.

Introduction

By now you should be prompted only on your moving off/stopping, clutch control, steering, gear changing, P.O.M and move off from the side of the road with little or no help from your instructor. Also you should be getting better at reading the road in front, beside and even behind your vehicle while you are driving (awareness and planning).


Teaching Strategy

On this lesson your instructor will reduce his prompts on previous lesson topics i.e. cockpit drill, gear changes, hand and foot controls, P.O.M whilst also giving you as much support on the M.S.P.S.G.L routine (hazard routine) and the use of L.A.D.A. This routine will also be utilised when meeting traffic and leaving adequate clearance around parked stationary vehicles, meeting traffic and the correct hold back position when you are giving way to oncoming vehicles.

The hazard and L.A.D.A routines during this lesson will be will be given by your instructor to a level to suit you… full talk through then reducing to either prompt or independent.

Lesson aims
The aim of today’s lesson is to learn when to hold your training vehicle back from behind a parked vehicles, where to hold the vehicle back when a vehicle is coming towards you and leaving adequate clearance at different speeds passing stationary vehicles, meeting traffic and the correct hold back position when you are giving way to oncoming vehicles.
During this lesson you will be assessed on your general drive but your instructor will be giving you as much support as you need. 

Objectives

Your objective is to be as independent as possible on your general drive. Your instructor will give you as much help on the new topic and by the end of your lesson you should be able to negotiate oncoming vehicles, leave adequate clearance, meeting traffic and the correct hold back position when you are giving way to oncoming vehicles, awareness and planning . Also improve your use of your mirrors with little or no help from your instructor. 
The two second rule
One of the biggest dangers on the road these days is tail gating 
(getting to close to the vehicles bumper in front and behind). 
It’s not just on urban areas drivers do this but also on motor ways, so there’s no wonder there are so many accidents. We should always leave a two second safety gap from each other.  This is how we gauge the gap: - When the vehicle in front of you gets to a landmark like a tree or a lamp post, we say to our self  “Only a fool breaks the two second rule”. If we are at the landmark before we complete the saying then we are too close and need to create a bigger gap.
Remember this is in dry weather;

Do you know what it is in wet weather? or even snow and ice?
Meeting and overtaking stationary vehicles

When you approach stationary vehicles use the Mirrors-Signal-Manoeuvre and the L.A.D.A routine a minimum of 3 times.

1. Once before you move out.
2. Once before you overtake the stationary vehicle.
3. Then again before you move back to your normal road position.

Awareness and planning using L.A.D.A. routine When you are going to overtake stationary vehicles you will be faced with one of three situations namely:-
Awareness and planning using L.A.D.A. routine

When you are going to overtake stationary vehicles you will be faced with one of three situations namely:-

Situation one 

No vehicles coming towards you (including no cyclists or pedestrians) So all you will need to do is check your – 
  • Mirrors right 
  • Position so you’re over the centre line (like in the above diagram). 
Once you are past the parked vehicle check your 
  • Mirrors left 
  • Position move to your normal road 

So as you can see, the hazard routine doesn’t need to use in full but needs to be done in order.


Situation two

A couple of vehicles  are coming towards you (or it could be a cyclists or pedestrians) So all you will need to do is check your 
  • Mirrors right 
  • Position so your vehicle is just left of the centre of the road 
  • Speed reduced to a walking pace
  • Gears down, probably 2nd gear, to let the cars get past the hazard (so far you have used M & P then M.P.S.G like in the above diagram) and once you are past the parked vehicle 

Once you are past the parked vehicle check your 
  • Mirrors left 
  • Position move to your normal road position

So as you can see, the hazard routine doesn’t need to use in full but needs to be done in order.

Situation three

A convoy of vehicles are coming towards you (or it could be a cyclists or pedestrians) This is going to be difficult if you don’t think about it. Check your 
Mirrors right 
Position so your vehicle is just left of the centre of the road but this time you will need to hold back a minimum of 2/3 vehicles, then reduce your 
Speed to a crawling pace or stop if it a big queue and change your 
Gears down, probably 1st gear, to let the cars get past the hazard (so far you have used M & P then M.P.S.G) 

Once the road has cleared you then can proceed safely 
  • Mirrors right (again) 
  • Signal (unless it misleads any other road user) 
Before committing to moving out make sure you check your 
  • Mirrors to see if anyone is behind you and then consider giving a
  • Signal, determine whether it would benefit anyone
  • Position so you’re over the centre line (like in the above diagram).
Once you are past the parked vehicle check your
  • Mirrors left
  • Position move to your normal road Increasing your
  • Speed  
  • Gears
to making progress.
So as you can see, the hazard routine doesn’t need to use in full but needs to be done in order.
Correct holding back position
Move out to just left of the centre of the road to gain a better view of any oncoming traffic. If you cannot overtake the stationary vehicles without affecting any oncoming traffic slow down and be prepared to stop just left of the centre of the road about two car lengths (the hold back position) from the rear of the stationary vehicle.
Meeting oncoming traffic
On busy housing estates you can sometimes be confronted with the problem of meeting traffic head on where it is difficult to determine who has priority, where your view is very restricted or where the gap you intend to proceed through is very narrow. Anticipation and planning is necessary as all road users should be polite and give common courtesy.
Try to ensure that you are seen and if possible obtain eye contact with the other road users. Assess the speed and distance of the approaching vehicle. If you are confident that you will arrive earlier than the oncoming vehicle it is likely that the other driver will give you priority but don’t assume it. The narrower the gap and the more pedestrians around you the slower your speed should be:-
  • Give a1 metre clearance (door length) from parked vehicles and from the centre line when travelling at 30 mph.
  • Give a ½  metre clearance (1/2 door length) from parked vehicles and from the centre line when travelling at 15mph. 
  •  However if you cannot give a1 metre clearance (door length) or even ½ a door length from parked vehicles and from the centre line when travelling reduce your speed to a walking or crawling pace 5 mph.
Don’t forget to look out for children or any kind or pedestrians when passing the parked vehicles and leaving adequate clearance.

Overtaking slow moving vehicles (cyclists)

The overtaking manoeuvre requires you to employ the hazard drill at least three times. Once as part of the preparation to overtake, once as part of the actual overtake and once as you return back to the left side of the road.
Reflect & Review
So remember your instructor is there to HELP you so on your driving lesson if you have any uncertainties or need anything rewording or recapping to make things any clearer, just ask. 

Your training vehicle is fitted with dual Controls and if necessary will be used during your lesson. These are there for your safety so we can step in to keep you safe. 

 So don’t worry if the issues arise we will aid and guide you VERBALLY or PHYSICALLY.

Risk management

Physical control of your vehicle 

The aim is for you, the student, to have full control of this lesson. As with previous lessons you will be given full talk through on the new topic, reducing throughout with you making the decisions as best you can. 

Your instructor’s job is to analyse any faults that may occur in this lesson and put them right. 

Talk about any issues or situations that happen on the driving lesson and put the issues right.
● Fault identification.
● Fault analysis.
● Remedial action.

Level of instruction on your lesson

● Full talk through.
● Prompt.
● Independent.

End of lesson

● Feed back at the end of your lesson.
● Student’s responsibility on lesson and improvements.
● Plan for the next lesson.
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